Archive | November, 2013

Drilling for hydrocarbons can impact aquatic life

7 Nov

Drilling for hydrocarbons can impact aquatic life

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6-Nov-2013

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Contact: Kallie Huss
onepress@plos.org
415-568-3162
Public Library of Science

Drilling sumps can leak into surface water


The degradation of drilling sumps associated with hydrocarbon extraction can negatively affect aquatic ecosystems, according to new research published November 6th in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Joshua Thienpont and colleagues at Queen’s University and other institutions.

Hydrocarbons are a primary source of energy as combustible fuel. Although hydrocarbon exploration and extraction are profitable enterprises, hydrocarbons contribute to the formation of greenhouse gases and are therefore a major stressor to the environment.

During the process of exploring for hydrocarbons, drilling sumps are used to permanently store the waste associated with drilling. In the Mackenzie Delta region of Canada’s western Arctic, more than 150 drilling sumps were constructed for this purpose. Although the areas surrounding the sumps were believed to be frozen by the surrounding permafrost, recent findings suggest that these areas may actually be thawing. In this study, the authors examine the environmental effects of this type of drilling sump containment loss in the Mackenzie Delta.

Because drilling fluids are saline, they tested whether leakage to surface waters was occurring by measuring changes in conductivity, as saline is more conductive than pure water. They also hypothesized that if saline-rich wastes from drilling sumps were impacting lakes, there should be changes in the types of life forms present. Zooplankton, for example, are a key component of aquatic ecosystems and various species survive differently in saline versus fresh water.



Through an analysis of lake sediments, they found changes in the community composition of zooplankton due to sump degradation. These results suggest that climate change and permafrost thaw can have deleterious consequences to aquatic life through the degradation and leaking of drilling sumps.

Thienpont elaborates, “The leaching of wastes from drilling sumps represents a newly identified example of one of the cumulative impacts of recent climate change impacting the sensitive freshwater ecosystems of the Arctic.”

###

Citation: Thienpont JR, Kokelj SV, Korosi JB, Cheng ES, Desjardins C, et al. (2013) Exploratory Hydrocarbon Drilling Impacts to Arctic Lake Ecosystems. PLoS ONE 8(11): e78875. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078875

Financial Disclosure: This work was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada through Discovery grants to MFJP, JMB and JPS, and an NSERC Northern Supplement to MFJP. The Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP) also provided logistical support to MFJP. The cumulative impact monitoring program (CIMP) provided support for collection of water chemistry results. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interest Statement: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

PLEASE LINK TO THE SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT (URL goes live after the embargo ends): http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0078875

Disclaimer: This press release refers to upcoming articles in PLOS ONE. The releases have been provided by the article authors and/or journal staff. Any opinions expressed in these are the personal views of the contributors, and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of PLOS. PLOS expressly disclaims any and all warranties and liability in connection with the information found in the release and article and your use of such information.

About PLOS ONE: PLOS ONE is the first journal of primary research from all areas of science to employ a combination of peer review and post-publication rating and commenting, to maximize the impact of every report it publishes. PLOS ONE is published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS), the open-access publisher whose goal is to make the world’s scientific and medical literature a public resource.

All works published in PLOS ONE are Open Access. Everything is immediately availableto read, download, redistribute, include in databases and otherwise usewithout cost to anyone, anywhere, subject only to the condition that the original authors and source are properly attributed. For more information about PLOS ONE relevant to journalists, bloggers and press officers, including details of our press release process and our embargo policy, see the everyONE blog at http://everyone.plos.org/media.



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Drilling for hydrocarbons can impact aquatic life

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Kallie Huss
onepress@plos.org
415-568-3162
Public Library of Science

Drilling sumps can leak into surface water


The degradation of drilling sumps associated with hydrocarbon extraction can negatively affect aquatic ecosystems, according to new research published November 6th in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Joshua Thienpont and colleagues at Queen’s University and other institutions.

Hydrocarbons are a primary source of energy as combustible fuel. Although hydrocarbon exploration and extraction are profitable enterprises, hydrocarbons contribute to the formation of greenhouse gases and are therefore a major stressor to the environment.

During the process of exploring for hydrocarbons, drilling sumps are used to permanently store the waste associated with drilling. In the Mackenzie Delta region of Canada’s western Arctic, more than 150 drilling sumps were constructed for this purpose. Although the areas surrounding the sumps were believed to be frozen by the surrounding permafrost, recent findings suggest that these areas may actually be thawing. In this study, the authors examine the environmental effects of this type of drilling sump containment loss in the Mackenzie Delta.

Because drilling fluids are saline, they tested whether leakage to surface waters was occurring by measuring changes in conductivity, as saline is more conductive than pure water. They also hypothesized that if saline-rich wastes from drilling sumps were impacting lakes, there should be changes in the types of life forms present. Zooplankton, for example, are a key component of aquatic ecosystems and various species survive differently in saline versus fresh water.



Through an analysis of lake sediments, they found changes in the community composition of zooplankton due to sump degradation. These results suggest that climate change and permafrost thaw can have deleterious consequences to aquatic life through the degradation and leaking of drilling sumps.

Thienpont elaborates, “The leaching of wastes from drilling sumps represents a newly identified example of one of the cumulative impacts of recent climate change impacting the sensitive freshwater ecosystems of the Arctic.”

###

Citation: Thienpont JR, Kokelj SV, Korosi JB, Cheng ES, Desjardins C, et al. (2013) Exploratory Hydrocarbon Drilling Impacts to Arctic Lake Ecosystems. PLoS ONE 8(11): e78875. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078875

Financial Disclosure: This work was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada through Discovery grants to MFJP, JMB and JPS, and an NSERC Northern Supplement to MFJP. The Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP) also provided logistical support to MFJP. The cumulative impact monitoring program (CIMP) provided support for collection of water chemistry results. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interest Statement: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

PLEASE LINK TO THE SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT (URL goes live after the embargo ends): http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0078875

Disclaimer: This press release refers to upcoming articles in PLOS ONE. The releases have been provided by the article authors and/or journal staff. Any opinions expressed in these are the personal views of the contributors, and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of PLOS. PLOS expressly disclaims any and all warranties and liability in connection with the information found in the release and article and your use of such information.

About PLOS ONE: PLOS ONE is the first journal of primary research from all areas of science to employ a combination of peer review and post-publication rating and commenting, to maximize the impact of every report it publishes. PLOS ONE is published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS), the open-access publisher whose goal is to make the world’s scientific and medical literature a public resource.

All works published in PLOS ONE are Open Access. Everything is immediately availableto read, download, redistribute, include in databases and otherwise usewithout cost to anyone, anywhere, subject only to the condition that the original authors and source are properly attributed. For more information about PLOS ONE relevant to journalists, bloggers and press officers, including details of our press release process and our embargo policy, see the everyONE blog at http://everyone.plos.org/media.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

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]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/plos-dfh110513.php
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Lenovo sells a record four devices per second as phone and tablet demand soars

7 Nov

Lenovo sells a record four devices per second, doubles the size of its nonPC business

In stark contrast to Dell, with its corporate upheavals and hygiene issues, Lenovo’s business is still booming. The company sold a record 29 million devices last quarter and saw double-digit rises in revenue and profit — a level of growth that almost makes it seem like it has stepped out of the stagnant PC market and into something illegal. What’s actually happening, however, is healthy and continuing diversification: unit sales of smartphones and tablets overtook PCs back in the summer, and now, when combined with smart TVs, account for 15 percent of Lenovo’s revenue — versus eight percent a year ago and just four percent the year before that. With the company’s regular PC trade also in good shape, snatching nearly an 18 percent slice of that traditional market, it’s perhaps a shame that the company has reportedly been prevented from expanding even faster.

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/11/07/lenovo-reports-record-sales/?ncid=rss_truncated
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Possible evidence of Arafat poisoning is reported

7 Nov

FILE – In this May 31, 2002 file photo, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat pauses during the weekly Muslim Friday prayers in his headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah. Al-Jazeera is reporting that a team of Swiss scientists has found moderate evidence that longtime Palestinian leader Arafat died of poisoning. The Arab satellite channel published a copy of what it said was the scientists’ report on its website on Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)

FILE – In this May 31, 2002 file photo, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat pauses during the weekly Muslim Friday prayers in his headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah. Al-Jazeera is reporting that a team of Swiss scientists has found moderate evidence that longtime Palestinian leader Arafat died of poisoning. The Arab satellite channel published a copy of what it said was the scientists’ report on its website on Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)

(AP) — Swiss scientists have found evidence suggesting Yasser Arafat may have been poisoned with a radioactive substance, a TV station reported Wednesday, prompting new allegations by his widow that the Palestinian leader was the victim of a “shocking” crime.

Palestinian officials have long accused Israel of poisoning Arafat, a claim Israel has denied. Arafat died under mysterious circumstances at a French military hospital in 2004, a month after falling ill at his Israeli-besieged West Bank compound.

The findings reported Wednesday appear to be the most significant so far in an investigation into Arafat’s death initiated by his widow, Suha, and the satellite TV station Al-Jazeera.

Last year, Switzerland’s Institute of Radiation Physics discovered traces of polonium-210, a deadly radioactive isotope, on some of Arafat’s belongings. Soil and bone samples were subsequently taken from Arafat’s grave in the West Bank.

On Wednesday, the TV station published the Swiss team’s 108-page report on the soil and bone samples. The results “moderately support the proposition that the death was the consequence of poisoning with polonium-210,” the report said.

Repeated attempts to reach the main author, Patrice Mangin, or the Lausanne-based institute’s spokesman, Darcy Christen, were unsuccessful Wednesday night.

Experts not connected to the report said the results support the case that Arafat was poisoned, but don’t prove it.

Suha Arafat told Al-Jazeera she was stunned and saddened by the findings.

“It’s a shocking, shocking crime to get rid of a great leader,” she said.

She did not mention Israel, but suggested that a country with nuclear capability was involved in her husband’s death. “I can’t accuse anyone, but how many countries have an atomic reactor that can produce polonium?” she said.

Polonium can be a byproduct of the chemical processing of uranium, but usually is made artificially in a nuclear reactor or a particle accelerator. Israel has a nuclear research center and is widely believed to have a nuclear arsenal, but remains ambiguous about the subject.

Arafat’s widow demanded that a Palestinian committee that has been investigating her husband’s death now try to find “the real person who did it.”

The committee also received a copy of the report, but declined comment.

The head of the committee, Tawfik Tirawi, said details would be presented at a news conference in two days, and that the Palestinian Authority, led by Arafat successor Mahmoud Abbas, would announce what it plans to do next.

An official in Abbas’ Fatah movement raised the possibility of taking the case to the International Criminal Court. “We will pursue this crime, the crime of the century,” said the official, Abbas Zaki.

Raanan Gissin, who was an Israeli government spokesman when Arafat died, reiterated Wednesday that Israel had no role in his death.

“It was a government decision not to touch Arafat at all,” he said, adding that “if anyone poisoned him, it could have been someone from his close circle.”

Arafat died Nov. 11, 2004, a month after falling violently ill at his Ramallah compound. French doctors said he died of a massive stroke and had suffered from a blood condition known as disseminated intravascular coagulation, or DIC. But the records were inconclusive about what led to the DIC, which has numerous possible causes, including infections and liver disease.

Polonium is a rare and highly lethal substance. A miniscule amount can kill. Its most famous victim was KGB agent-turned-Kremlin critic Alexander Litvinenko, who died in London in 2006 after the substance was slipped into his tea.

The examination of the Arafat’s remains found “unexpectedly high levels” of polonium-210, the Swiss team wrote.

Derek Hill, a professor in radiological science at University College London who was not involved in the investigation, said the levels of polonium-210 cited in the report seem “way above normal.”

“I would say it’s clearly not overwhelming proof, and there is a risk of contamination (of the samples), but it is a pretty strong signal,” he said. “It seems likely what they’re doing is putting a very cautious interpretation of strong data.”

He said polonium is “kind of a perfect poison” because it is so hard to detect unless experts look for it using specialized equipment generally found only in government laboratories.

Bruce Goldberger, director of health forensic medicine at the University of Florida, said the report was appropriately cautious in saying it had found moderate support for the idea that polonium poisoning killed Arafat. It does not prove that idea, he said.

Yet, “what they did was extraordinary” in view of the limitations they faced, he said. Those include the lack of fresh body tissue to analyze, the years of polonium decay that would leave only tiny amounts to look for and the lack of medical and scientific knowledge about polonium poisoning.

Goldberger noted that Arafat did not show some classic signs of radiation poisoning, further muddying the strength of the conclusion.

Lawrence Kobilinsky, a professor of forensic science at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, also said the report does not prove Arafat died from polonium. He noted that other scientific teams are expected to issue reports on the case.

“It looks like he’s been poisoned, but I would wait for the other groups to confirm it,” he said. “It’s not done until we get a confirmation. This is how science works”

Nathan Lents, deputy chair of the department of sciences at John Jay, said the report’s results are consistent with a possible polonium poisoning, but “there’s certainly not a smoking gun here.”

___

Associated Press writers Malcolm Ritter in New York, Josef Federman in Jerusalem, Gregory Katz in London, Lori Hinnant in Paris and John Heilprin in Geneva contributed to this report.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/cae69a7523db45408eeb2b3a98c0c9c5/Article_2013-11-06-Arafat’s%20Death/id-9d7f3ca8493b41f08b6bba9e8df697c1
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In Violent Hospitals, China’s Doctors Can Become Patients

7 Nov

Hospital workers protest against attacks on medical workers outside the No. 1 People’s Hospital in Wenling, in east China’s Zhejiang province, on Oct. 28. The protest came after a man stabbed three doctors, killing one, three days earlier.

AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Hospital workers protest against attacks on medical workers outside the No. 1 People’s Hospital in Wenling, in east China’s Zhejiang province, on Oct. 28. The protest came after a man stabbed three doctors, killing one, three days earlier.

AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Several hundred doctors and nurses jammed the courtyard of the No. 1 People’s Hospital in Wenling, a city with a population of about 1 million in Zhejiang province, a four-hour train ride south of Shanghai.

They wore surgical masks to hide their identities from the government and waved white signs that read, “Zero tolerance for violence.”

“Doctors and nurses must be safe to take care of people’s health!” video shows them chanting.

The medical workers were reacting to a triple stabbing at the hospital three days earlier. Wenling officials responded by deploying dozens of riot police, further angering already traumatized hospital staff.

“Withdraw the special forces,” chanted the nurses and doctors, many of whom wore white lab coats.

The last couple of weeks have been bad ones for medical workers in China, even by the violent standards of the country’s hospitals. In addition to the attack in Wenling on Oct. 25, another angry patient in Harbin, in China’s far northeast, stabbed a doctor to death. And in south China’s Guangdong province, family members of a patient who died beat two doctors, leaving one with kidney damage.

A patient rests on a bed in the corridor of a crowded hospital in Beijing.

Ng Han Guan/AP

A patient rests on a bed in the corridor of a crowded hospital in Beijing.

Ng Han Guan/AP

In Wenling, a patient angry over the results of a sinus operation killed one doctor with a butcher knife and injured another. After overcoming a pair of security guards, the attacker went on to stab a third doctor more than a dozen times, one of the victims told NPR.

One physician at the hospital, who asked only to be identified by his English name, Dr. Jones, says medical workers here are scared.

“Protection measures in hospitals are almost nonexistent,” he says, speaking in a private room in a city tea house. “These security guards had no training. Actually, they can’t protect us.”

Patient Upset Over Expensive Treatment

Police arrested the attacker, Lian Enqing, who lives in the countryside, where he makes mahjong tables, earning about $300 a month.

Lian’s sister, Chao, says her brother was furious after spending more than $13,000 on what he saw as a failed surgery and treatment.

“He couldn’t sleep at night,” Chao says, sitting on a hand-carved wooden stool in the bare living room of her parents’ house. “He said he didn’t sleep because he felt uncomfortable. He became grumpier and grumpier, even smashed things and beat people.”

Lian had also been diagnosed as suffering from paranoia, according to medical records, but Dr. Jones says Chinese hospitals have become such stressful places, even mentally balanced patients can snap.

“There are more and more insults, threats and attacks on medical staff,” says Jones, in defiance of a hospital order that employees not talk to the news media. “Actually, every day patients insult doctors.”

Last year, seven medical workers died in attacks in China, according to the state-run New China News Service. Patients and their family members assaulted staff at more than 60 percent of hospitals, according a survey by the Chinese Hospital Association. The survey also found that nearly 40 percent of doctors have considered quitting and nearly 1 in 6 say they’d never let their child study medicine.

Stress For Doctors, Patients

Dr. Jones says the problem is that government policies intended to improve health care actually pit doctors against patients. In recent years, China’s government has extended health insurance to more than 90 percent of the population — a huge improvement from a decade and a half ago.

People wait in line at a counter for medical services at the Guanganmen Chinese medicine hospital in Beijing.

David Gray/Reuters /Landov

People wait in line at a counter for medical services at the Guanganmen Chinese medicine hospital in Beijing.

David Gray/Reuters /Landov

But out-of-pocket expenses are still very heavy and millions of patients with high expectations now flood city hospitals, often overwhelming staff.

“The intensity and pressure of our job are tremendous,” Jones says. “Sometimes you can hardly imagine it. I see 70 patients every day, generally no more than five minutes at a time. It’s unavoidable that patients are dissatisfied.”

For all that work, though, first-year doctors in Wenling earn less in base salary than the man who attacked them last month, and Jones says physicians are expected to generate huge fees for the hospital through drug sales and procedures. This has lead — by all accounts — to rampant corruption across the country.

As a teenager in the 1980s, Lijia Zhang worked in a missile factory where the state provided all health care. The system was incredibly wasteful. Zhang, who wrote about her experiences in the memoir Socialism Is Great recalls medicine was so plentiful, workers used to throw pills at each other for fun.

A Rise In Corruption

China shifted from a command economy to a more market-oriented one and turned hospitals into profit-driven ventures. A few years ago, Zhang says, an anesthesiologist shook her family down for bribes over surgery for a cousin, who was dying of leukemia.

“He demanded about $3,300,” Zhang recalls. “My cousin’s family was poor. We all had to chip in money. The reason we paid the money is we thought the operation was very dangerous. We thought if we didn’t pay, it may jeopardize the health of my cousin.”

After paying bribes, if a surgery goes badly, many patients are understandably enraged.

China’s government is pressing hospitals to beef up protection.

Last month, the Ministry of Public Security told medical centers with more than 2,000 beds that they had to have at least 100 security guards. But the government must do much more, says Yanzhong Huang, senior fellow for Global Health at the Council on Foreign Relations.

“I don’t think that simply pouring more money into the health care sector would solve the problem,” he says.

Instead, Huang thinks the government needs to encourage more competition from private hospitals to — hopefully — increase efficiency and drive down costs in a system dominated by public medical centers. The government also needs to strengthen China’s medical malpractice claims process, so patients can turn to the courts with confidence.

“If you don’t have legal, institutionalized channels to address the disputes, then the patients have no other alternative but to rely on violent means,” Huang says.

Unfortunately, China’s leaders have a full plate of economic issues to address in the coming years. Hospital reform is not high on the agenda and attacks are likely to continue.

Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2013/11/06/242344329/in-violent-hospitals-chinas-doctors-can-become-patients?ft=1&f=1001
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Bombings kill 16 in Syria

7 Nov

BEIRUT (AP) — Bombs targeting the entrance of a landmark Ottoman railway building in Damascus and a feared security agency in Syria’s southeast killed at least 16 people on Wednesday, activists reported.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attacks, but rebels tied to al-Qaida have previously claimed bombings of security institutions and have also targeted the center of the capital, trying to take the war to the heart of President Bashar Assad’s power.

Eight died and at least 50 more people were wounded in the blast at the country’s railways authority, housed in a century-old structure that was once the main Damascus train station, reported state news agency SANA and activists.

State TV broadcast images showing several wounded people walking away from the site of the blast, passing apartment buildings and shops with their windows blown out. Part of the railway building’s wooden roof was shattered.

Also Wednesday, a suicide car bomb smashed into the entrance of the air force intelligence agency in the southeast city of Sweida, killing eight people, said activists. State media reported a blast but did not say it hit the security compound.

The British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported that a high-ranking officer was killed, and the other slain belonged to the security agency. Syria’s air force intelligence is notorious for running detention centers where detainees are abused and sometimes tortured.

The blast in Sweida was a rare attack targeting a city dominated by Druse, a small, secretive Muslim sect who have mostly stayed on the sidelines of the Syrian war.

Syria’s 23 million people belong to a startling patchwork of different religious groups, and the three-year conflict has taken increasingly sectarian overtones in the past year. Syrian rebels are overwhelmingly Sunni and some of the strongest fighting brigades are formed of al-Qaida loyalists. Assad’s security services are dominated by Alawites, a sect of Shiite Islam to which the Syrian leader belongs.

Syria’s minority Christians and Shiites have been targeted in previous attacks because Sunni rebels perceive them as siding with Assad.

The Syrian railways authority is housed in a structure was built during the rule of Ottoman Sultan Abdul Hamid II, according to a plaque affixed to the building.

It was part of the Hijaz train line that once stretched from the Ottoman Empire’s capital of Istanbul to the holy Muslim city of Medina in what is now Saudi Arabia. It began running through Damascus in 1908, the plaque said. The Hijaz line was halted years after it was created.

But Syria’s internal railway system — partly built off the old Ottoman lines — was only halted during this uprising after rebels attacked part of the railway lines.

_____

Associated Press writers Albert Aji in Damascus and Barbara Surk in Beirut and contributed to this report.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/bombings-kill-16-syria-165201234.html
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Watch Every Single Nexus Phone Speed Tested at the Same Time

6 Nov

The Nexus 5 is here, and it’s the best Android can offer. But the Nexus line has come a long long way from its beginnings back in 2010, both in design and performance. How far? See for yourself.

Read more…

    



Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/7WCWxVt304o/watch-every-single-nexus-phone-speed-tested-at-the-same-1459387869
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Kristen Bell in Flare December 2013: I Didn’t Feel Connected to my Baby During Pregnancy

6 Nov

She gave birth to her daughter Lincoln last summer, and now Kristen Bell reveals her emotional struggles during the pregnancy in the December 2013 issue of Flare.

While showing off her post-baby figure in designer duds from David Koma and Gucci for the Yu Tsai-shot spread, the “Veronica Mars” beauty dished about her lack of connection to the baby while pregnant and revealed her secrets to having a strong marriage.

Check out a few highlights from Miss Bell’s interview below. For more, be sure to visit Flare!

On her love for Lincoln before her birth:
“I kept saying to [Dax] in all sincerity during my pregnancy, ‘I just don’t know how I’m going to like her as much as I like my dogs. I was being serious. Because I f***ing love my dogs; they are my children. I love people the more I know them, and I didn’t know her. It could’ve been a water bottle in my belly, that’s about how connected I felt to her during my pregnancy. Within about 24 hours after she came out, my hormones reset, and they reprogrammed and my feelings about her.”

On her and Dax’s rules of marriage:
“Check your ego at the door, and be aware of when the other person is spinning out. As artists, everything is vanity – and narcissism – driven: My career, the strategy behind it, the next level I want to hit, my photo shoot, how I was in my acting scene, my premiere. So we try to do a really good job of being human beings in the rest of our life.”

On meeting Dax:
“We would not have been friends in high school. He was a drug addict and he was wild, and I was very much a good girl who went to Catholic school. He is also five years older than I am, and he lived in Milford, which is a bit more drive-your-tractor-to-the-7-eleven-type Michigan, and I was closer to downtown Detroit. And then two weeks later, I went to a Kings versus Red Wings game – he was with someone I knew, and I was with my roommate – and we ran into each other. It was on from that point.”

Source: http://celebrity-gossip.net/magazines/covers-magazine-december-2013-1030241
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